Nile’s Project Urges Sepsis Awareness/Prevention for COVID-19 and Other Infectious Disease Survivors

Non-profit is sharing websites to find free access to online materials as sepsis risk increases due to pandemic

RIVERSIDE, CA, USA, June 4, 2020 /EINPresswire.com/ — Nile’s Project, a 501c3 non-profit foundation and public awareness/educational organization dedicated to preventing avoidable death and harm from infectious diseases, today announced an educational initiative to increase awareness of sepsis by those who have experienced COVID-19 or other infectious diseases.

“One of the deadly side effects of COVID-19 is that it makes patients especially vulnerable to sepsis, the body’s overwhelming and life-threatening response to infection of any kind,” said Ty Moss, Chief Executive Officer, Nile’s Project. “Sepsis can result from a skinned knee playing baseball, a cut on the finger acquired while gardening or a urinary tract infection, to give just a few examples.”

Moss added, “Our latest public awareness campaign is focused on educating people about the four signs of sepsis and to act fast if you or a loved one are experiencing two of these symptoms as identified by The Sepsis Alliance. We also applaud the U.S. government’s Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for educating us all about what they’ve learned about the coronavirus.”

Moss urged everyone to learn more from the CDC at:

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-nCoV/index.html

and from the Sepsis Alliance at:

https://www.sepsis.org/sepsisand/coronavirus-covid-19

Moss also voiced Nile’s Project’s support for a separate campaign by the CDC and many partners around the world that shines a light on the fact that sepsis is an entirely preventable disease.

He said the CDC’s ”Get Ahead of Sepsis. Know the Signs. Act Fast.” campaign provides clear data on the size of the problem and how to become educated and prevent harm and death by assessing useful tools at:

https://www.cdc.gov/sepsis/index.html

Brochures and videos for patients are available at:

https://www.cdc.gov/sepsis/education/patient-resources.html

Brochures and videos for healthcare workers can be accessed at:

https://www.cdc.gov/sepsis/education/hcp-resources.html

“Sepsis is a preventable disease, but it must be acted upon fast to prevent harm,” Moss said. “Each year in the United States more than 1.7 million people get sepsis and 270,000 of them die. The CDC estimates of the 700,000 survivors of sepsis are living with the side effects and many COVID-19 patients who have suffered serious infections could be at risk.”

Moss recommended that people familiarize themselves with the
Sepsis Alliance’s (sepsis.org) powerful tool “T.I.M.E. pocket card” that lists the four signs of sepsis, namely:

• Temperature: Lower or Higher
• Infection of any Kind
• Mental decline
• Extreme pain

Moss said, “The T.I.M.E. pocket card is available for download at no charge on the Nile’s Project website at: http://www.nilesproject.com/card.pdf and we strongly urge everyone to familiarize themselves with the warning signs of sepsis and to keep the card with them at all times, especially now that the coronavirus pandemic is such a threat.”

Moss added, “Preventing sepsis is crucial since its lifelong impacts can be devastating. This can include permanent damage to vital internal organs and even loss of limbs. Nile’s Project is committed to educating everyone so sepsis can be identified at the earliest possible opportunity. If you are a sepsis survivor, this link will help you understand that living after sepsis may be very different and that you are not alone.” That link is:
https://www.cdc.gov/sepsis/pdfs/life-after-sepsis-fact-sheet.pdf

Nile’s Project was formed in 2007 when Ty and Carole Moss unexpectedly lost their 15- year-old son Nile, who died from delayed treatment of sepsis after he contracted a bacterial infection called MRSA (methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus) from unclean surfaces while undergoing an MRI at the top Children’s hospital in Orange County, California.

“Getting Ahead of Sepsis in the Time of COVID-19” is the latest public health advocacy initiative launched by Nile’s Project. The organization is educating the public by supporting and promoting the CDC’s Sepsis Awareness Campaign, “Getting Ahead of Sepsis. Know the Signs. Act Fast” and the Sepsis Alliance’s T.I.M.E. initiative.

Nile’s Project is making a wide range of CDC and the Sepsis Alliance materials available to print or download at no charge at: www.nilesproject.com

Specifically, Nile’s Project urges people to click on the links titled “Getting Ahead of Sepsis in the Time of COVID-19,” and then clicking on the Sepsis Alliance “T.I.M.E.” card graphic.

Website visitors can also click on the link from the CDC titled, “Get Ahead of Sepsis. Know the Signs. Act Fast.” for printable brochures and posters.

Additionally, both Carole and Ty Moss are available for online or virtual meeting presentations about how to prevent sepsis, with the special emphasis on how COVID-19 increases risks of the disease.

“Nile’s Project believes those benefitting from these online, remote and virtual meetings include businesses, schools, religious organizations and other groups, plus local state and national governments and agencies,” Moss said. Arrangements can be made by contacting Carole Moss: carolemoss@msn.com

Nile’s Project has been a vital part of patient safety advocacy since its inception. It has partnered with the CDC, including serving on its Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee. Carole Moss is a voting member with scientists and laboratory experts on improving outpatient clinical diagnostic testing capabilities. She also serves as a subject matter expert on the California Hospital Acquired Infection Advisory Committee.

The couple reach over a million listeners nationwide through drive-time radio interviews, sharing what they’ve learned from experts about preventing the spread of infectious diseases in healthcare venues and in the community as a whole. They’ve also provided information about the urgent need to understand and prevent the threat of sepsis.

Nile’s Project received a “Humanitarian Award” from the Long Beach Unified School District in California, and a “Hero Award” from KNX News Radio in Los Angeles.

About Nile’s Project
Nile’s Project is a coalition of Nile’s friends, entertainers, musicians, artists and others dedicated to ending unnecessary deaths from MRSA, Staph, C.diff, VRE, Covid-19, Sepsis
and other hospital acquired and community acquired infections. Nile’s Project is devoted to ending the suffering and preventable deaths through education and public awareness. Website: www.nilesproject.com

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Ty Moss
Nile's Project
+1 949-235-2859
email us here


Source: EIN Presswire